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Craft a plan of attack

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Video: estimate and formulate the work plan

So how is this going to work, exactly?  What is our hypothesis?  (basically, a reasoned guess about how to solve a problem).  In other words, what do we think will be our best process for turning our chosen creature into a drill bit holder?  Let’s do some planning:

a. start with the hypothesis

Our hypothesis is pretty simple:

We need to store a bunch of dremel bits...
...we don't want to dump them in a box...
...a wood block works, but is ugly...
...holes in a figurine could be nice!

This project in particular is super-simple, so we could just jump right in  and start cutting.  But the smart thing to do for many projects is to roll a bit of feasibility study first.  Save yourself a bunch of time and money with a bit of measurement and some mock-up sketching.

b. estimate twice, cut once: paper drafting

I’m gonna use my invention notebook for this test sketch, since it’s always on my bench.  I recommend this type of rig to get your ideas preserved and developed.  This approach also that helps provide some legal cover for documenting first invention!
Stick-on card holder 1 of 3 Stick-on pen holder 2 of 3 High-quality, quad-rule lay-flat lab notebook 3 of 3
I’ve attached a business card holder, and a pen holder, to a really well-made notebook with these key ingredients: grid rule, multiple bookmark ribbons for different idea categories, numbered pages, places for dates and witness signatures.  I use this type of rig daily, to document all my ideas.  I also take it with me to meetings, super useful there.

c. do a full-scale test sketch

I take my selected dino, lay him on the page, trace around him. Then I trace in the accessories, and in this way do a very rough estimate of if I can fit all of these pieces: a cut-off wheel, a wire brush, a glass wheel, four drill bits, two carbide wheels.   But also, I know I’m going to buy more.  So add a few extra slots.  And it looks to me like, if I space these at about 10-15mm, it’s probably going to work out.
Crude, but sufficient: this idea will likely work
So, not such a pretty drawing, huh?  But it does its job: I drew in all my bits and accessories, and a few extra holes for new tools, and it looks like all of them will fit nicely in the Stegosaurus if I cut off all his spines. This is our plan.  So let’s try it!

Next: get set up to build…